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THIS MONTH'S GUEST ARTICLE
Across a wide range of business and engineering topics, these articles are presented with the intent of sharing knowledge and provoking thought, possibly even serving as a catalyst for action. Send us your topic suggestions and abstracts. We are always in search of engaging professional content. Contact us at news@vaeng.com for details.

5 Critical Steps to Better Meetings
October 2019

By: Rich Horwath

Are your meetings creating valuable new insights for the business or are they a series of multitasking-filled monologues? Are they productive conversations about key business issues or a rehashing of the same stuff you’ve been talking about for months? Are your meetings getting better or worse?

Answer these five sample questions from the Strategic Meetings Assessment for the meetings you typically attend:

1. Relevant information is sent out prior to meetings to avoid one-way presentations during the meetings. Yes No

2. Meetings start at their scheduled time. Yes No

3. People are fully attentive and not engaged in multitasking (e.g., checking phones). Yes No

4. People leave meetings with a clear understanding of who is doing what by when. Yes No

5. I decline meeting invitations when the purpose and/or agenda have not been communicated. Yes No
In this brief sample, a score of three or more “No’s” indicates an opportunity to dramatically improve the efficacy and productivity of your meetings.

A meeting can be defined as a gathering of two or more people featuring collective interaction and engagement using conversations to make progress toward a purpose. Note the use of the words “interaction” and “conversations” in the definition. If you find yourself in meetings and especially teleconferences on a regular basis where the format is primarily one-way presentation, there’s ample opportunity to improve your situation.

Research shows that meetings consume about 40 percent of working time for managers. Key data points from research to consider:

• Up to half of the content of meetings is either not relevant to participants or could be delivered outside of a meeting.
• 20 percent of meeting participants should not be there.
• 40 percent of meeting time is spent on information that could be delivered before the meeting.
• 50 percent of meetings executives attend are rated as “ineffective” or “very ineffective.”

There are five critical steps you can follow to help your organization take a more strategic approach to meetings and teleconferences:

1. Conduct a meetings audit
Before a doctor prescribes a medication, she first diagnoses the patient’s condition. In the same spirit, before you prescribe new meeting guidelines, it’s helpful to first baseline what’s happening today. Look at factors such as the types of meetings you attend, the frequency of meetings, and the length of meetings. Then identify the reasons these meetings exist and if there are any meetings that are not necessary. Once the audit is complete, it provides a bounty of useful information to shape the future state of meetings.

2. Identify current meeting mistakes
Meeting mistakes occur in three phases: pre-meeting, in-meeting, and post-meeting. They can also be categorized as either leader or participant mistakes. For example, a common in-meeting mistake by the leader is failing to rein in off-track conversations. A common in-meeting mistake by participants is multitasking, which conveys a lack of interest in the topic and/or a lack of respect for the person speaking at the time. There are approximately 25 mistakes to look for in the three phases to ensure that the group is not sabotaging their own efforts at improvement.

3. Educate managers on what good looks like
Begin this step by collecting the current best practices being used by managers within the organization. Then look externally to see what principles and guidelines are being used by other organizations within and outside your industry as it relates to meetings. Examples of best practice principles include things such as “identify decisions to make in the meeting” and “create a virtual table of participants for teleconferences.” Use these best practices to compile a list of new meeting standards.

4. Utilize meeting tools
One of the keys to leading effective and efficient meetings is aligning the goals of the meeting with the appropriate tools and processes to get there. For instance, if you’re leading a strategy development meeting, there are more than 70 different strategic thinking tools you can choose from to help your team think and plan strategically. The key is to select the handful of tools that make the most sense based on the context of the team, business goals, competitive landscape, etc. Be clear on your meeting goals and then choose the process and tools to get there.

5. Develop meeting checklists
Research in the social sciences on habits shows that in order to effectively change someone’s behavior, it’s helpful to provide physical or environmental triggers. One highly effective trigger is the use of meeting checklists. These physical reminders ensure that teams across the organization are aware of the basic meeting principles, techniques, and tools to optimize their meeting time. However, the checklists are only valuable if they are accompanied by the corresponding discipline to utilize them on a consistent basis.

Effective meetings can be energizing forums to help your team set direction, make decisions, and unify efforts. Ineffective meetings can be anchors that weigh people down with irrelevant information, didactic presentations, and unclear priorities. Which type do you attend today? Do you think it will be different tomorrow?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Rich Horwath is a New York Times bestselling author on strategy, including his most recent book, StrategyMan vs. The Anti-Strategy Squad: Using Strategic Thinking to Defeat Bad Strategy and Save Your Plan. As CEO of the Strategic Thinking Institute, he has helped more than 100,000 managers develop their strategy skills through live workshops and virtual training programs. Rich is a strategy facilitator, keynote speaker, and creator of more than 200 resources on strategic thinking. To sign up for the free monthly newsletter Strategic Thinker, visit: www.StrategySkills.com.



Guest Articles
Below are listed the 12 most recent Guest Articles.
To see the entire list of Guest Articles, visit the Guest Article Archive.
To be alerted to new Guest Articles, subscribe to The Virginia Engineer Newsfeed: Atom / RSS

5 Critical Steps to Better Meetings
October 2019

Are your meetings creating valuable new insights for the business or are they a series of multitasking-filled monologues?

By: Rich Horwath

Strategies for Remaining Indispensable at Work: Proving Your Value
September 2019

The economy is booming—great! But wait—organizations continue to focus on cutting labor costs. Why? Labor costs comprise 80 percent or more of an organization’s operating costs.

By: Michele Wierzgac, MSEd

Hiring is an Emotional Exercise: 4 Tips for Selecting the Best Candidate
August 2019

Have you ever looked at a set of resumes and felt totally overwhelmed?

By: Jeremy Eskenazi

Business Valuations: Three Situations When You Might Not Need One
July 2019

Business valuations are an important tool for owners and leaders of privately-held companies.

By: Patrick Ungashick

The Gift of Feedback
June 2019

7 Steps to Move from Confrontation to Conversation

By: Dr. David Chinsky

4 Reasons Every Professional Should Have a Strategic Plan for Personal Development
May 2019

If you are serious about growing your business, everyone on your team needs a strategic plan for their own development that is separate from and exceeds the company’s current needs. Here’s why.

By: Tra Williams

Change Your Mindset or Suffer the Consequences
April 2019

We live in a world of unpredictable and uncontrollable change. How can we survive and even thrive when our environment turns against us?

By: Brad Wolff

Stalled Sales?
March 2019

If you are struggling with sluggish sales, there are two critical areas you must review to address the situation.

By: Jill J. Johnson

How Human Are You?
February 2019

How human are you? At work do you care more about profits or people? In sales, are you and the company more interested in making quota than taking care of the customer?

By: John Waid

VCU is engineering for Amazon HQ2’s workforce
January 2019

As Virginians, let’s not be overly concerned with where Amazon is in Virginia. Amazon HQ2’s influence — and its needs — will be too big to be confined to Northern Virginia.

EDITORIAL:
Barbara D. Boyan, Ph.D.

Connecting with Customers Through the Keyboard: Getting Your Chat Service Right
December 2018

Providing exceptional service via chat involves more than simply choosing a technology platform.

By: Kate Zabriskie

Giving Yourself Permission Slips to Succeed
November 2018

Joan was sitting at a round table when a hand descended over her right shoulder and slapped a piece of paper down on the wooden surface. A permission slip lay before her. Joan wondered, “Why do I need a permission slip?”

By: Sarah Bateman


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