SITE SEARCH:
video overview
ADS

IIr Associates, Inc.
Publisher of The Virginia Engineer

Print-Publishing Services
Web Site Design-Coding-Hosting
Business Consulting

Phone: (804) 779-3527
sales@iirassoc.com
iirassoc.com

NEWS
Clothing Temperature Ratings Being Researched
December 1, 2008

When buying a winter coat in a store, online or from a catalog, shoppers have a pretty good idea of its appearance. Knowing how warm it will keep them, however, takes guesswork.

Manufacturers put temperature ratings on jackets, coveralls and other such products, said Elizabeth McCullough, professor of textiles at Kansas State University (K-State) and co-director of the Institute for Environmental Research. She said manufacturers have different methods to determine those temperature ratings.

Prof. McCullough is chairing a committee in the American Society for Testing and Materials to develop a standard formula for determining the temperature ratings for cold-weather clothing. The goal is to have all manufacturers doing the same testing so a consumer can compare one product to another. Prof. McCullough said this would be particularly helpful to consumers who can’t try on the garment because they’re shopping online or from catalogs.

A temperature rating is the lowest temperature at which a consumer can be comfortable when wearing outdoor clothing. Prof. McCullough’s work involves first measuring the insulation value of a cold-weather ensemble with a thermal manikin and then using the value in a whole body heat loss model developed by Steve Eckels, K-State professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Institute for Environmental Research. The model assumes all other variables like relative humidity and wind speed are the same. The clothing worn underneath the jacket during testing has to be the same, too.

“One thing consumers need to realize is that the ratings are not just for the garment, they’re for the whole ensemble,” Prof. McCullough said. “You’re not going to be comfortable if you’re only wearing the jacket.”

How comfortable you are in a garment depends on the outside environment, the clothing worn and activity level of the person.


  ------   News Item Archive  -----  
 
 
The Virginia Engineer MobileOur Mobile site
m.vaeng.com
The Virginia Engineer on facebook
The Virginia Engineer RSS Feed