SITE SEARCH:
video overview
ADS

IIr Associates, Inc.
Publisher of The Virginia Engineer

Print-Publishing Services
Web Site Design-Coding-Hosting
Business Consulting

Phone: (804) 779-3527
sales@iirassoc.com
iirassoc.com

NEWS
Contamination May Linger
December 1, 2009

When authorities discover a “meth house,” they decontaminate it by removing chemicals, getting rid of carpeting, cleaning walls, and airing the place out for a few days. Dr. Glenn Morrison, an associate professor of environmental engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology, is wondering if the decontamination methods are sufficient to protect future occupants from exposure to methamphetamine and other chemicals.

“Most people who live in a former meth house don’t even know it,” he says. “And some hotel rooms have also been contaminated.”

Recently, Dr. Morrison was awarded $116,000 from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to research the interactions between building materials and the chemicals used in methamphetamine labs.

According to Dr. Morrison, the chemicals penetrate into materials like paint, wood and vinyl flooring and then “slowly come back to the surface over time.”

Dr. Morrison is leading the Missouri S&T study in conjunction with researchers at the University of Texas-Austin.


  ------   News Item Archive  -----  
 
 
The Virginia Engineer MobileOur Mobile site
m.vaeng.com
The Virginia Engineer on facebook
The Virginia Engineer RSS Feed